Corporate Affairs

  • 0

    Airlines association welcomes limited restart of South African aviation but still seeks aid

    The Airlines Association of Southern Africa (AASA) has welcomed the re-authorisation, on a limited basis, of domestic commercial flying in South Africa. This was the consequence of the government’s decision to ease the national lockdown restrictions (intended to counter the Covid-19 pandemic) from Level 4 to Level 3 at the start of this month. Under Level 3 regulations, local airlines can resume services to and from Johannesburg, Cape Town and Durban. Regarding Johannesburg, both OR Tambo International and Lanseria International airports are permitted to operate. However, all five airports must have strict health and biosecurity measures in place, as must the airlines.

  • 0

    OR Tambo International Airport reports surge in air cargo operations

    State-owned Airports Company South Africa’s OR Tambo International Airport, east of Johannesburg, has reported that, over the period from March 26 to May 22, it handled 1 400 arriving and departing air cargo flights. This amounted to a 62% increase over the same period last year. For April – the only full month for which statistics are so far available – 476 cargo flights arrived at the airport. The figure for April 2019 was 294. “With most economic activity limited for the past two months, we remain very much aware of the airport’s roles and responsibilities in facilitating cargo flights at this time,” said OR Tambo International Airport spokesperson Betty Maloka.

  • 0

    OR Tambo International Airport reports surge in air cargo operations

    State-owned Airports Company South Africa’s OR Tambo International Airport, east of Johannesburg, has reported that, over the period from March 26 to May 22, it handled 1 400 arriving and departing air cargo flights. This amounted to a 62% increase over the same period last year. For April – the only full month for which statistics are so far available – 476 cargo flights arrived at the airport. The figure for April 2019 was 294. “With most economic activity limited for the past two months, we remain very much aware of the airport’s roles and responsibilities in facilitating cargo flights at this time,” said OR Tambo International Airport spokesperson Betty Maloka.

  • 0

    Boeing announces low-rate restart of 737 MAX airliner production

    US aerospace giant Boeing announced on May 27, at Renton in the US state of Washington, that it was restarting production of its troubled 737 MAX single-aisle airliner. This restart would initially be at a low rate, with only one of the three production lines at the Renton facility being used. The production of the airliner had been temporarily suspended in January. The company reported that it was implementing more than 12 procedures to increase both safety in the plant and the quality of the product. 

  • 0

    Boeing announces low-rate restart of 737 MAX airliner production

    US aerospace giant Boeing announced on May 27, at Renton in the US state of Washington, that it was restarting production of its troubled 737 MAX single-aisle airliner. This restart would initially be at a low rate, with only one of the three production lines at the Renton facility being used. The production of the airliner had been temporarily suspended in January. The company reported that it was implementing more than 12 procedures to increase both safety in the plant and the quality of the product. 

  • 0

    International and national air transport bodies appeal to South Africa to support its airlines

    The International Air Transport Association (Iata), the Airlines Association of Southern Africa (AASA) and the Board of Airline Representatives of South Africa (Barsa) have jointly appealed to the South African government to provide direct financial relief to the country’s airline sector. This was to help counter the severe effects of the Covid-19 pandemic and the consequent national lockdown and commercial air passenger travel ban. Iata has estimated that South African airline revenues this year would plummet 56% in comparison to last year. In monetary terms, this would be a fall of $3-billion, or some R55-billion. This would endanger 252 100 South African jobs, as well as cost the country $5.1-billion (about R93-billion) in gross domestic product, provided by the aviation and aviation-dependent tourism sectors.

  • 0

    International and national air transport bodies appeal to South Africa to support its airlines

    The International Air Transport Association (Iata), the Airlines Association of Southern Africa (AASA) and the Board of Airline Representatives of South Africa (Barsa) have jointly appealed to the South African government to provide direct financial relief to the country’s airline sector. This was to help counter the severe effects of the Covid-19 pandemic and the consequent national lockdown and commercial air passenger travel ban. Iata has estimated that South African airline revenues this year would plummet 56% in comparison to last year. In monetary terms, this would be a fall of $3-billion, or some R55-billion. This would endanger 252 100 South African jobs, as well as cost the country $5.1-billion (about R93-billion) in gross domestic product, provided by the aviation and aviation-dependent tourism sectors.

  • 0

    Iata reports that global airline debt as ballooned as a result of Covid-19 measures

    In its latest briefing regarding the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic (and the near total halt in commercial air passenger traffic to help try and contain it) on the global airline industry, the International Air Transport Association (Iata) has reported that it expected global airline debt to jump by 28% by the end of this year, in comparison to the start of this year. In numbers, this increase would come to nearly $120-billion, taking the global airline industry’s debt burden to almost $550-billion. This was because, around the world, over half of government aid to airlines would have to be repaid. Airlines had also been raising funds through commercial borrowing, to a total so far of $52-billion.

  • 0

    Iata reports that global airline debt as ballooned as a result of Covid-19 measures

    In its latest briefing regarding the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic (and the near total halt in commercial air passenger traffic to help try and contain it) on the global airline industry, the International Air Transport Association (Iata) has reported that it expected global airline debt to jump by 28% by the end of this year, in comparison to the start of this year. In numbers, this increase would come to nearly $120-billion, taking the global airline industry’s debt burden to almost $550-billion. This was because, around the world, over half of government aid to airlines would have to be repaid. Airlines had also been raising funds through commercial borrowing, to a total so far of $52-billion.

  • 0

    SAA getting ready to restart domestic flying

    State-owned national flag carrier South African Airways (SAA) is making preparations for the resumption of domestic air flights, between Johannesburg and Cape Town. It is seeking to be operationally ready for the the restart of this route in the middle of next month, should this be authorised. However, the airline is also, with immediate effect, cancelling all its regional and international services until the end of next month. This is because of the widespread international restrictions on air travel, imposed to counter the Covid-19 pandemic. Such restrictions make it impossible to sustainably resume flights beyond the country’s borders.

Page 2 of 8612345...102030...Last »

Khudu Technologies © 2015 . All rights reserved.